Envision recaptures the excitement and challenges surrounding the 115-year history of GE’s healthcare business. From the earliest days in the tiny basement of a modest Chicago home to today’s globe-girdling medical technology giant, it’s all here—the people, the events, the places, and the breakthroughs that helped make “General Electric” synonymous with the finest in advanced healthcare.

GE Healthcare is a global leader in medical diagnostic imaging (x-ray, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic  resonance, and nuclear), information technologies, medical diagnostics, patient monitoring systems, drug systems, drug discovery, biopharmaceutical manufacturing technologies and performance solutions. But the most important product we deliver is better, healthier lives for people around the world.

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Available Early September 2014

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To assure quality, employees in the GE pacemaker assembly facility on Edgerton Avenue were thoroughly trained and certified in a specified task.
Diathermy devices, such as this variable-frequency unit being used to treat a pneumonia patient, were a staple in Victor’s product catalog.
GE Healthcare’s Research Park facility in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. Ultrasound, Diagnostic Cardiology & Interventional Systems, plus the headquarters of Healthcare Systems are located here.
All WWII inductees received a chest x-ray.
Victor Multiplex Stereoscope allowed two physicians to view images in 3-D simultaneously.
GE fluoroscopy equipment in use at the Milwaukee Cancer Diagnostic Clinic (l-r: x-ray technologists Richard Krill and Roger A. Schultz, R.T.; radiologist Donald Knutson, M.D.).
Roentgenoscopic units being assembled in Dept. L. (1945)
GE engineers L. E. Dempster and N. E. Taris, Jr., install a 900 kV GE therapy tube at New York City’s Memorial Hospital. (1931)